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Posted by on Sep 1, 2015 in News | 0 comments

Female Viagra Will Soon Be On The Market

Female.Viagra_FEA

Female Viagra will be the market soon and it’s become a game changer for women.

Caution! Female Viagra makes women wetter than they appear. Although Viagra is not  as commonplace as taking Advil, society has started to shed the stigmatism of taking a pill that is meant to cure erectile dysfunction. For instance, Fiat has produced a commercial that’s been floating around. It starts off with a youthful, older couple, and while his beckoning woman is luring him to be, the aging man turns to his counter, preparing to pop his last little blue pill. Unfortunately, the man doesn’t have the best aim, misses his mouth, and flings his little blue pill out the window. To his horror, the pill ricochets across the villa, pinging off roofs and skipping across fountains. The  pill lands into the open gas tank of a car, and it the effects begin to work on the car. making it develop a significant bulge. It quickly transforms from a smaller sports car into an SUV, exciting the locals. If that little blue pill can make quickly engorge a car, making it more powerful and ready for action, is there something similar that can work for women? Can we get at least get a little pink pill? Something? More than 50 million women experience some type of sexual dysfunction. These issues are destructive to their relationships, to their families, and their self image. These women having been pushing for a treatment and after years spent with nowhere to turn, there might finally be an answer. An official female Viagra will hopefully be on the market soon!

In the 1990′s, Pfizer began development on a drug intended to treat high blood pressure. The drug would inhibit an enzyme that causes the blood vessels to contract, causing the cells to relax. But the plan did not work quite as intended and blood pressure would fall too low. But leave it to a pharmaceutical company to make it work. Pfizer took an interest in its unintended effect and discovered it worked as a treatment for erectile dysfunction. So in 1998, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the drug and it was christened Viagra. Since it approval, variations on Viagra’s have made it to market; what has been absent, however, has been “a Viagra for women.” 26 drugs have been FDA-approved for male sexual dysfunction; zero for women. Given the success of drugs to treat erectile dysfunction, such as sildenafil (Viagra), tadalafil (Cialis), and vardenafil (Levitra), drug companies have finally begun the hunt for a comparable drug for women. (Did anyone else notice that those three all end with “-fil”? Am I the only one with my mind in the gutter?) In the year 2015, the number of FDA-approved drugs for female sexual dysfunction is still zero; but that might finally be changing.

Female sexual response is complex. For many women, addressing difficulties with arousal may not get to the actual problem, which seems to often be a lack of sexual desire. Many factors influence a woman’s sexual desire. For some, the job, the kids, the hectic schedules, and the stresses of daily life can deplete their desire for sex. For others, the beginning or ending of a relationship, pregnancy, menopause, or other major life changes can affect highs and lows in sexual desire. For some women, the elusive orgasm creates concerns and leads to a loss of interest in sex. If I couldn’t have an elusive orgasms, I don’t think I would want sex as much as I do either. A woman’s desire is often connected to her sense of intimacy; it can be affected by her connection to her current partner (or partners; it’s a new age of sexual freedom, we can allow it) and past experiences. Chronic medical conditions that alter a woman’s sexual-response cycle can cause changes in arousal or orgasmic response. In some cases, medications, hormones, creams, stimulating products, or other treatments may be helpful. But for some, all of these and a session with Dr. Ruth might still not help. Products and sex therapists don’t always work and they definitely don’t always work for everyone. So, what’s a woman to do? Well, you can sign up for those tantric yoga sessions. You can down bottles of red wine and ginseng. You can gobble up oysters, licorice, and all the dark chocolate you want. You can try Zestra, a blend of botanical oils and extracts, that is designed to be rubbed on the clitoris. Proceed with caution with this one ladies; it’s been known to burn and not in a good way.

Everything You Need To Know About Female Viagra

Still not working? What about page 36 of that “Position of the Day” book you picked up last week? Still nothing? If you’re desperate to get in the mood, you might even snag a few of your guy’s little blue pills. If there is proof that Viagra works for women, why isn’t there an equivalent of Viagra for women? Even though Viagra has been tried as a treatment for sexual dysfunction in women, the FDA has not approved this use of Viagra. Since we are a tech savvy bunch, women diagnosed with low sexual desire have been turning to the Internet in desperation, seeking out unproven, unregulated, and potentially unsafe treatments which could pose health risks. Remember ladies, watch out for that Zestra. But this “unmet medical need,” as described by the FDA, might have found an answer in flibanserin. First developed as an anti-depressant, flibanserin works on neurotransmitters in the brain that affects sexual desire. Basically, it gives you a boost of serotonin and that can send your sex drive into over drive!

On June 4, 2015, a key advisory committee recommended that the FDA approve the drug. The potential side effects of fainting, nausea, dizziness, sleepiness, and low-blood pressure outweighed its benefits. But these are the same side effects experienced by men. FDA officials are concerned about flibanserin’s interaction with other drugs — particularly with hormonal birth control pills. They are most concerned that the drug not be used with alcohol, with certain drugs, or by pregnant women. But some members say that the data isn’t good enough, and who voted against approval.

These folks say the benefits weren’t strong enough. Though they recognize people are suffering, they know that the condition of low sexual desire is real and painful, they say flibanserin isn’t the answer. These folks are campaigning for a ‘real’ female Viagra; the women suffering deserved better. But the majority of the committee said that the drug should be made available to women who currently have nothing. When there are mental and emotional barriers, women need to remember that medications can’t produce a satisfying sex life. At this point, it seems that sexual dysfunction medication is best suited for women who were satisfied with their sexual response at one point and now, for whatever medical reason, are no longer able to respond. Women with significant emotional or relationship problems and women that have desire problems related to their interest in being sexual might not be the best candidates.

Some of these women described the condition as if a switch had gone off, they don’t understand why they no longer want to have sex and find it distressing. The American Psychiatric Association (APA) named the condition Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder back in 1980. But hypoactive sexual desire disorder was removed from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Disorders (DSM) in 2013. It’s pretty obvious that when it comes to sexual issues, men have the advantages. For one, it’s easy to tell when a man is aroused. And two, well, that’s the amount of options of prescription medications they have to treat sexual problems. Complicating matters is the fact that female sexual dysfunction is a controversial topic. Some sex experts claim that the pharmaceutical industry, healthcare professionals, and journalists overhyped the condition. But these comments trivializing the lagging libido of women; I’m thinking some of these sex experts have never had to deal with the pain of wanting to get down with your hunny and just not being aroused.

Maybe women are still unaware of the causes of their sexual inability and that seems to be a majority of the issue. Though it’s clear that sexual arousal for a woman is a different kind of animal than for a man’s, some feel that the flibanserin approval hijacks the language of sexual equality in an attempt to force an ineffective and unsafe drug on the market. One thing is for sure; Viagra and flibanserin were not created equally. Viagra treats erectile dysfunction, while flibanserin is claimed as an antidote for low sexual desire in women. But Viagra does not increase male libido; it works the blood flow and the mechanism that allows an erection to happen. Flibanserin is said to work on boosting women’s sexual desire, increased the number of sexually satisfying events, and lowered women’s distress at the loss of their libido. Regardless of people’s opinion, the committee vote is a huge moment for women’s sexual health. A pill for women’s sexual health can give them the ability to control their own sexual destiny, something women have been pushing for since the 1960’s. Here’s to hoping that all ladies everywhere get that wild night they’ve always dreamed of.

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